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Charlotte Rampling

Charlotte Rampling

Charlotte Rampling

Charlotte Rampling, OBE (born Tessa Charlotte Rampling; 5 February 1946) is an English actress. Her career spans four decades in English language as well as French andItalian cinema.

After beginning her career at age 17 in a commercial role and as a model, Rampling’s first screen appearance was uncredited as a water skier in Richard Lester’s film The Knack …and How to Get It in 1965, which was followed a year later by the role of Meredith in the film Georgy Girl.

In 1967 Charlotte played the gunfighter Hana Wilde in “The Superlative Seven”, an episode of The Avengers.  After this, her acting career blossomed in both English and French cinema.

Despite an early flurry of success, she told The Independent, “We weren’t happy. It was a nightmare, breaking the rules and all that. Everyone seemed to be having fun, but they were taking so many drugs they wouldn’t know it anyway.”

Rampling has performed controversial roles. In 1969, in Luchino Visconti’s The Damned (La Caduta degli dei), she played a young wife sent to a Nazi concentration camp. Critics praised her performance, and it cast her in a whole new image: mysterious, sensitive and ultimately tragic. “The Look” as co-star Dirk Bogarde called it, became her trademark.  In 1974′s The Night Porter she portrayed a former concentration camp inmate who after the war meets a former camp guard with whom she had an ambiguous relationship, and their relationship resumes. Bogarde played the camp guard. In Max mon amour, she played a woman who fell in love with a chimpanzee.

Rampling gained recognition from American audiences in a remake of Raymond Chandler’s detective story Farewell, My Lovely (1975) and later with Woody Allen’s Stardust Memories (1980) and particularly in The Verdict (1982), an acclaimed drama directed by Sidney Lumet that starred Paul Newman.

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.

Source: Wikipedia

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