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Ewan McGregor

 

Ewan McGregor

Ewan McGregor

Ewan Gordon McGregor (born 31 March 1971) is a Scottish actor who has had success in mainstream, indie, and art house films. He is perhaps best known for his roles as heroin addict Mark Renton in the drama Trainspotting (1996), Jedi Obi-Wan Kenobi in the Star Wars prequel trilogy (1999–2005), and poet Christian in the musical film Moulin Rouge! (2001). He has also received critical acclaim for his starring roles in theatre productions of Guys and Dolls (2005–07) and Othello (2007–08). McGregor was ranked No. 36 on Empire magazine’s “The Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time” list in 1997

 

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print in different sizes, signed and numbered by Piers Allardyce and is available to purchase here.


Barbra Streisand, One Of The Most Successful Entertainers in Modern History

Barbra Streisand

Barbra Streisand

Barbra Joan Streisand (born April 24, 1942) is an American singer, actress, film producer and director. She has won two Academy Awards,  eight Grammy Awards,  four Emmy Awards,  a Special Tony Award, an American Film Institute award,  a Peabody Award,  and is one of the few entertainers who have won an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Award.

She is one of the most commercially and critically successful entertainers in modern entertainment history, with more than 71.5 million albums shipped in the United States and 140 million albums sold worldwide. She is the best-selling female artist on the Recording Industry Association of America’s (RIAA) Top Selling Artists list, the only female recording artist in the top ten, and the only artist outside of the rock and roll genre.  Along with Frank Sinatra, Cher, and Shirley Jones, she shares the distinction of being awarded an acting Oscar and also recording a number-one single on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart.

According to the RIAA, Streisand holds the record for the most top-ten albums of any female recording artist – a total of 32 since 1963.  Streisand has the widest span (48 years) between first and latest top-ten albums of any female recording artist. With her 2009 album, Love Is the Answer, she became one of the rare artists to achieve number-one albums in five consecutive decades.  According to the RIAA, she has released 51 Gold albums, 30 Platinum albums, and 13 Multi-Platinum albums in the United States.

 

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.


Raquel Welch

Raquel Welch

Raquel Welch

Jo Raquel Tejada (born September 5, 1940), better known as Raquel Welch, is an American actress, author and sex symbol. Welch came to attention as a “new-star” on the 20th Century-Fox lot in the mid-1960s. She posed iconically in an animal skin bikini for the British-release One Million Years B.C. (1966), for which she may be best known. She later starred in Bedazzled (1967), Bandolero! (1968), 100 Rifles (1969), and the box office failure Myra Breckinridge (1970). Today, Welch is a noticeable face of television commercials for Foster Grant sunglasses and reading glasses.

 

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.


Dame Shirley Bassey

Dame Shirley Bassey

Dame Shirley Bassey

Dame Shirley Veronica Bassey, DBE (born 8 January 1937) is a Welsh singer. She found fame in the mid-1950s and has been called “one of the most popular female vocalists in Britain during the last half of the 20th century”. In the US, in particular, she is best known for recording the theme songs to the James Bond films Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), and Moonraker (1979).

 

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print in different sizes, signed and numbered found in Legende Reportage and is available to purchase here.


Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn

Add this portrait of the most lovely and classiest lady to your collection. You may purchase this Bob Willoughby image in different sizes here. 


Steve McQueen, The King of Cool

Steve McQueen

Steve McQueen

 

Terence Stephen “Steve” McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an American movie actor.  He was nicknamed “The King of Cool.”  His “anti-hero” persona, which he developed at the height of the Vietnam counterculture, made him one of the top box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s. McQueen received an Academy Award nomination for his role in The Sand Pebbles. His other popular films include The Magnificent Seven, The Blob, The Great Escape, The Thomas Crown Affair, Bullitt, The Getaway, Papillon, and The Towering Inferno. In 1974, he became the highest-paid movie star in the world. Although McQueen was combative with directors and producers, his popularity put him in high demand and enabled him to command large salaries.

He was an avid racer of both motorcycles and cars. While he studied acting, he supported himself partly by competing in weekend motorcycle races and bought his first motorcycle with his winnings. He is recognized for performing many of his own stunts, but one of the most widely claimed and cherished examples of this—that he did the majority of the stunt driving for his character during the high-speed chase scene in Bullitt—was revealed not to be true by his most trusted stuntman and stunt driver Loren James.

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill  and is available to purchase here.

 

Source: Wikipedia

Louis Armstrong

Louis Armstrong

Louis Armstrong

Louis Armstrong (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo orPops, was an American jazz trumpeter and singer from New Orleans, Louisiana.

Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an “inventive” cornet and trumpet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance. With his instantly-recognizable gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer, demonstrating great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also greatly skilled at scat singing (vocalizing using sounds and syllables instead of actual lyrics).

Renowned for his charismatic stage presence and voice almost as much as for his trumpet-playing, Armstrong’s influence extends well beyond jazz music, and by the end of his career in the 1960s, he was widely regarded as a profound influence on popular music in general. Armstrong was one of the first truly popular African-American entertainers to “cross over”, whose skin-color was secondary to his music in an America that was severely racially divided. He rarely publicly politicized his race, often to the dismay of fellow African-Americans, but took a well-publicized stand fordesegregation during the Little Rock Crisis. His artistry and personality allowed him socially acceptable access to the upper echelons of American society that were highly restricted for a black man.

 

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Bob Willoughby and is available to purchase here.


Eric Clapton, Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee

Eric Clapton

Eric Clapton

 

Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE, (born 30 March 1945) is an English guitarist and singer-songwriter. Clapton is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: once as a solo artist, and separately as a member of The Yardbirds and Cream. Clapton has been referred to as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time.  Clapton ranked second in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” and fourth in Gibson’s Top 50 Guitarists of All Time.

In the mid 1960s, Clapton departed from the Yardbirds to play blues with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. In his one-year stay with Mayall, Clapton gained the nickname “Slowhand”. Immediately after leaving Mayall, Clapton formed Cream, a power trio with drummer Ginger Baker and bassist Jack Bruce in which Clapton played sustained blues improvisations and “arty, blues-based psychedelic pop.” For most of the 1970s, Clapton’s output bore the influence of the mellow style of J.J. Cale and the reggae of Bob Marley. His version of Marley’s “I Shot the Sheriff” helped reggae reach a mass market. Two of his most popular recordings were “Layla”, recorded by Derek and the Dominos, and Robert Johnson’s “Crossroads”, recorded by Cream. A recipient of seventeen Grammy Awards,  in 2004 Clapton was awarded a CBE for services to music.  In 1998, Clapton, a recovering alcoholic and drug addict, founded the Crossroads Centre on Antigua, a medical facility for recovering substance abusers.

 

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.


Barbara Windsor

Barbara Windsor

Barbara Windsor

 

Barbara Windsor, MBE (born Barbara Ann Deeks on 6 August 1937) is an English actress. Her best known roles are in the Carry On films and as Peggy Mitchell in the BBC soap opera EastEnders. Born in Shoreditch, London in 1937,  Windsor was the only child of John Deeks, a costermonger, and his wife, formerly Rose Ellis, a dressmaker. Windsor is of English and Irish ancestry.  She passed her 11-plus exams with the highest marks in North London, and won a place at Our Lady’s Convent in Stamford Hill. Her mother paid for her to have elocution lessons, and she trained at the Aida Foster School in Golders Green, making her stage debut at 13 and her West End debut in 1952 in the chorus of the musical Love From Judy.

Her first film role was in The Belles of St Trinian’s in 1954. She joined Joan Littlewood’s Theatre Workshop at the Theatre Royal, Stratford East, coming to prominence in their stage production Fings Ain’t Wot They Used to Be and Littlewood’s film Sparrers Can’t Sing in 1963, achieving a BAFTA nomination for Best British Film Actress. She also appeared in the 1964 film comedy Crooks in Cloisters, the 1968 film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and in the sitcoms The Rag Trade and Wild, Wild Women. In 1980, Windsor appeared as “Saucy Nancy” in the second series of Worzel Gummidge.

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print in different sizes, signed and numbered by Piers Allardyce and is available to purchase here.

 

Source: Wikipedia

Sigourney Weaver, The Sci Fi Queen

Sigourney Weaver

Sigourney Weaver

Sigourney Weaver (born Susan Alexandra Weaver; October 8, 1949) is an American actress. She is known for her critically acclaimed role of Ellen Ripley in the four Alien films: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, and Alien Resurrection, for which she has received worldwide recognition.

Other notable roles include Dana Barrett in Ghostbusters and its sequel Ghostbusters II, Gorillas in the Mist: The Story of Dian Fossey, Working Girl, Death and the Maiden, The Ice Storm, Galaxy Quest, Snow Cake, Prayers for Bobby and Grace Augustine in Avatar and its prequel video game.

Weaver has been nominated for three Academy Awards, three BAFTA Awards (one win), two Emmy Awards, six Saturn Awards (two wins) and six Golden Globe Awards, winning two in 1988 for Gorillas in the Mist and Working Girl, becoming the first person ever to have won two acting Golden Globe Awards in the same year.  She was also nominated for a Drama Desk Award and a Tony Award.

Her 1986 Academy Award nomination for Aliens is considered as a landmark in the recognition of science fiction, action, and horror genres, as well as a major step in challenging the gender role in cinema. Weaver progressively received notoriety for her numerous contributions to the science fiction film history (including minor roles in successful works such as Futurama, WALL-E and Paul) and gained the nickname of “The Sci-Fi Queen”.

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.

 


The Beatles, Most Iconic Band in History

The Beatles

The Beatles

The Beatles are considered by many to be the most successful rock band of all time. They were together from 1960 through 1970 where they conquered the UK, the US and the world. They consisted of four members: John Lennon (rhythm guitar, harmonica), Paul McCartney (bass guitar), George Harrison (lead guitar) and Ringo Starr (drums, from August 1962 – 1970).

The band began as a skiffle group formed by John Lennon in Liverpool, UK in early 1957 called The Quarrymen. On 6th July 1957 Paul McCartney met John Lennon at aQuarrymen performance and within a few days had joined the band. George Harrisonwas introduced to John and the rest of the band by Paul in February 1958, but was not invited to join right away due to his only being 14 years old. Since John and Paul were playing rhythm guitar and they needed a suitable lead guitarist, George was eventually let into the group as the lead guitarist in March 1958. Original Quarrymen drummer Colin Hanton left the band in 1959 and they had to go through a few other drummers and sometimes let drummers from other bands fill in for them. In January 1960, Stuart Sutcliffe, John’s close friend from art college joined the band as bassist, agreeing to learn how to play and to remain sort of in the background until he became proficient with his instrument. Over these forming years came changes in name. For a short time they were calling themselves Johnny and The MoondogsStuart Sutcliffe suggested Beetlesat some point as a similarity to Buddy Holly and the Crickets. Liking the idea, the band changed their name to Long John and The Silver Beetles. This was shortened to The Silver Beetles and then, by August 1960, The Beatles, using an ‘a’ in the spelling as a pun meant to suggest “beat music”.

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.

 

 


Rex Harrison

Rex Harrison

Rex Harrison

 

Price On Application

Sir Reginald Carey “Rex” Harrison (5 March 1908 – 2 June 1990) was an English actor of stage and screen.

Harrison began his career on the stage in 1924. He won his first Tony Award for his performance as Henry VIII in Anne of the Thousand Days in 1949. He won his second Tony for the role of Professor Henry Higgins in the stage production of My Fair Lady in 1957. He reprised the role for the 1964 film version, which earned him a Golden Globe Award and Best Actor Oscar.

In addition to his stage career, Harrison also appeared in numerous films, including Anna and the King of Siam (1946), The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947), Cleopatra (1963), and Doctor Dolittle (1967). In July 1989, Harrison was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II.

In 1975, Harrison released his first autobiography. His second, A Damned Serious Business: My Life in Comedy, was published posthumously in 1991.

Harrison was married a total of six times and had two sons: Noel and Carey Harrison. He continued working in stage productions until shortly before his death from pancreatic cancer in June 1990 at the age of 82.

 

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.


Frank Sinatra, One Of The Finest American Singers

Frank Sinatra

Frank Sinatra

 

Francis Albert “Frank” Sinatra ( December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer and film actor. Beginning his musical career in the swing era with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey, Sinatra became an unprecedentedly successful solo artist in the early to mid-1940s, after being signed to Columbia Records in 1943. Being the idol of the “bobby soxers”, he released his first album, The Voice of Frank Sinatra in 1946. His professional career had stalled by the 1950s, but it was reborn in 1954 after he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in From Here to Eternity.

He signed with Capitol Records in 1953 and released several critically lauded albums (such as In the Wee Small Hours, Songs for Swingin’ Lovers, Come Fly with Me, Only the Lonely and Nice ‘n’ Easy). Sinatra left Capitol to found his own record label, Reprise Records in 1961 (finding success with albums such as Ring-a-Ding-Ding!, Sinatra at the Sands and Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim), toured internationally, was a founding member of the Rat Pack and fraternized with celebrities and statesmen, including John F. Kennedy. Sinatra turned 50 in 1965, recorded the retrospective September of My Years, starred in the Emmy-winning television special Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music, and scored hits with “Strangers in the Night” and “My Way”.

With sales of his music dwindling and after appearing in several poorly received films, Sinatra retired for the first time in 1971. Two years later, however, he came out of retirement and in 1973 recorded several albums, scoring a Top 40 hit with “(Theme From) New York, New York” in 1980. Using his Las Vegas shows as a home base, he toured both within the United States and internationally, until a short time before his death in 1998.

Sinatra also forged a successful career as a film actor, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in From Here to Eternity, a nomination for Best Actor for The Man with the Golden Arm, and critical acclaim for his performance in The Manchurian Candidate. He also starred in such musicals as High Society, Pal Joey, Guys and Dolls and On the Town. Sinatra was honored at the Kennedy Center Honors in 1983 and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Ronald Reagan in 1985 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 1997. Sinatra was also the recipient of eleven Grammy Awards, including the Grammy Trustees Award, Grammy Legend Award and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

 **Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Bob Willoughby and is available to purchase here.

 

Source: Wikipedia

Bob Dylan, One Of The Greatest Artists

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan ( born Robert Allen Zimmerman on May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, musician, poet and painter. He has been a major and profoundly influential figure in popular music and culture for five decades.  Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s when he was an informal chronicler and a seemingly reluctant figurehead of social unrest. A number of his early songs such as “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “The Times They Are a-Changin’” became anthems for the US civil rights and anti-war movements. Leaving his initial base in the culture of folk music behind, Dylan proceeded to revolutionize perceptions of the limits of popular music in 1965 with the six-minute single “Like a Rolling Stone”.

His lyrics incorporated a variety of political, social, philosophical, and literary influences. They defied existing pop music conventions and appealed hugely to the then burgeoning counterculture. Initially inspired by the songs of Woody Guthrie,  Robert Johnson, Hank Williams, and the performance styles of Buddy Holly and Little Richard, Dylan has both amplified and personalized musical genres. His recording career, spanning fifty years, has explored numerous distinct traditions in American song—from folk, blues and country to gospel, rock and roll, and rockabilly, to English, Scottish, and Irish folk music, embracing even jazz and swing.

Dylan performs with guitar, keyboards, and harmonica. Backed by a changing line-up of musicians, he has toured steadily since the late 1980s on what has been dubbed the Never Ending Tour. His accomplishments as a recording artist and performer have been central to his career, but his greatest contribution is generally considered to be his songwriting.

Since 1994, Dylan has published three books of drawings and paintings, and his work has been exhibited in major art galleries. As a songwriter and musician, Dylan has received numerous awards over the years including Grammy, Golden Globe, and Academy Awards; he has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, and Songwriters Hall of Fame. In 2008, a road called the Bob Dylan Pathway was opened in the singer’s honor in his birthplace of Duluth, Minnesota. The Pulitzer Prize jury in 2008 awarded him a special citation for “his profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power.”

**Picture shown is available in  limited edition print of only 100 in different sizes, signed and numbered found in Legende Reportage and is available to purchase here.


Jean Shrimpton

Jean Shrimpton

Jean Shrimpton

Jean Rosemary Shrimpton (born 7 November 1942) is an English model and actress. She was an icon of Swinging London and is considered to be one of the world’s first supermodels. She appeared on covers such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Elle, Ladies’ Home Journal, Newsweek, and Time magazines. She starred alongside Paul Jones in the 1967 film Privilege.

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.

 


Queen

Queen

Queen

Queen are an English rock band formed in London in 1970, originally consisting of Freddie Mercury (lead vocals, piano), Brian May (guitar, vocals), John Deacon (bass guitar), and Roger Taylor (drums, vocals). Queen’s earliest works were influenced by progressive rock, hard rock and heavy metal, but the band gradually ventured into more conventional and radio-friendly works, incorporating further diverse styles into their music.

 

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.


Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn

Add this portrait of the most lovely and classiest lady to your collection. You may purchase this Bob Willoughby image in different sizes here. 

 

 

 


Fernando Torres

Fernando Torres

Fernando Torres

Fernando José Torres Sanz (born 20 March 1984), nicknamed El Niño (The Kid in Spanish), is a Spanish footballer who plays as a striker for Chelsea and the Spain national team.

Torres started his career with Atlético Madrid, progressing through their youth system to the first team squad. He made his first team debut in 2001 and finished his time at the club having scored 75 goals in 174 La Liga appearances. Prior to his La Liga debut, Torres played two seasons in the Segunda División for Atlético Madrid, making 40 appearances and scoring seven goals.

Torres joined Premier League club Liverpool in 2007, after signing for a club record transfer fee. He marked his first season at Anfieldby being Liverpool’s first player since Robbie Fowler in the 1995–96 season to score more than 20 league goals in a season. The most prolific goalscoring spell of his career, he became the fastest player in Liverpool history to score 50 league goals. He was named in the FIFA World XI in 2008 and 2009. Torres left the club in January 2011 to join Chelsea for a record British transfer fee of £50 million, which made him the most expensive Spanish player in history. In his first full season at Chelsea, Torres won the FA Cup and the UEFA Champions League, despite receiving criticism for a comparatively low goal-scoring record. The following season he scored in the final of the 2012-13 UEFA Europa League, helping Chelsea to win the competition for the first time. He joined team-mate Juan Mata in becoming the first players to have held all 4 of the Champions LeagueEuropa LeagueWorld Cup and theEuropean Championships simultaneously.

Torres is a Spanish international and made his debut against Portugal in 2003. He has been capped over 100 times and is his country’s third-highest goalscorer of all time. With Spain he has participated in five major tournaments; UEFA Euro 2004, the 2006 FIFA World CupUEFA Euro 2008, the 2010 FIFA World Cup and UEFA Euro 2012. Spain won the latter three tournaments, with Torres scoring in the finals of both Euro 2008 and Euro 2012.

**Picture shown is available to purchase here.

 


Jimi Hendrix, Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductee

Jimi Hendrix Experience in black and white

Jimi Hendrix Experience in black and white

James Marshall “Jimi” Hendrix (born Johnny Allen Hendrix; November 27, 1942  –  September 18, 1970) was an American guitarist and singer-songwriter. He is widely considered to be the greatest guitarist in musical history, and one of the most influential musicians of his era across a range of genres.  After initial success in Europe with his group The Jimi Hendrix Experience, he achieved fame in the United States following his 1967 performance at the Monterey Pop Festival. Later, Hendrix headlined the iconic 1969 Woodstock Festival and the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival. He often favored raw overdriven amplifiers with high gain and treble and helped develop the previously undesirable technique of guitar amplifier feedback.

Hendrix, as well as his friend Eric Clapton, popularized use of the wah-wah pedal in mainstream rock which he often used to deliver an exaggerated sense of pitch in his solos, particularly with high bends, complex guitar playing, and use of legato. As a record producer, Hendrix also broke new ground in using the recording studio as an extension of his musical ideas. He was one of the first to experiment with stereophonic phasing effects for rock recording.

Hendrix was influenced by blues artists such as B.B. King, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Albert King and Elmore James,  rhythm and blues and soul guitarists Curtis Mayfield and Steve Cropper, and the jazz guitarist Wes Montgomery. Hendrix (who was then known as ‘Maurice James’) began dressing and wearing a moustache like Little Richard when he performed and recorded in his band from March 1, 1964 through to the spring of 1965.  In 1966, Hendrix stated, “I want to do with my guitar what Little Richard does with his voice”.

Hendrix won many of the most prestigious rock music awards in his lifetime, and has been posthumously awarded many more, including being inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992 and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2005. An English Heritage blue plaque was erected in his name on his former residence at Brook Street, London, in September 1997. A star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (at 6627 Hollywood Blvd.) was dedicated in 1994. In 2006, his debut US album, Are You Experienced, was inducted into the United States National Recording Registry, and Rolling Stone named Hendrix the top guitarist on its list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all-time in 2003.

 

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print  signed and numbered by Gered Mankowitz  and is available to purchase here.


Orson Welles, The Ultimate Auetur.

Orson Welles

Orson Welles

George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985), best known as Orson Welles, was an American film director, actor, theatre director, screenwriter, and producer, who worked extensively in film, theatre, and television after starting his career in radio drama. Orson Welles is noted for his innovative dramatic productions as well as his distinctive voice and personality. He was always an outsider to the studio system, and directed only 13 full-length films in his career, although his first feature film, Citizen Kane, is widely considered a seminal movie classic. While he struggled for creative control in the face of studios, many of his films were heavily edited and others left unreleased. His distinctive directorial style featured layered, nonlinear narrative forms, innovative uses of lighting such as chiaroscuro, unique camera angles, sound techniques borrowed from radio, deep focus shots, and long takes. He has been praised as a major creative force and as “the ultimate auteur.”

After directing a number of high-profile theatrical productions in his early twenties, including an innovative adaptation of Macbeth and The Cradle Will Rock, Welles found national and international fame as the director and narrator of a 1938 radio adaptation of H. G. Wells’ novel The War of the Worlds performed for the radio drama anthology series Mercury Theatre on the Air. It was reported to have caused widespread panic when listeners thought that an invasion by extraterrestrial beings was occurring. Although these reports of panic were mostly false and overstated,  they rocketed Welles to instant notoriety.

Citizen Kane (1941), his first film with RKO, in which he starred in the role of Charles Foster Kane, is often considered the greatest film ever made. Several of his other films, including The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), The Lady from Shanghai (1947), Touch of Evil (1958), Chimes at Midnight (1965), and F for Fake (1974), are also widely considered to be masterpieces.

In 2002, he was voted the greatest film director of all time in two separate British Film Institute polls among directors and critics, and a wide survey of critical consensus, best-of lists, and historical retrospectives calls him the most acclaimed director of all time.  Well known for his baritone voice, Welles was also an extremely well regarded actor and was voted number 16 in AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Stars list of the greatest American film actors of all time. He was also a celebrated Shakespearean stage actor and an accomplished magician, starring in troop variety shows in the war years.

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.


Oliver Reed

Oliver Reed

Oliver Reed

Robert Oliver Reed (13 February 1938 – 2 May 1999) was an English actor known for his burly screen presence. Reed exemplified his real-life macho image in “tough guy” roles. His films include The Trap, Oliver!, Women in Love, Hannibal Brooks, The Triple Echo, The Devils, The Three Musketeers, Tommy, Castaway, Lion of the Desert and Gladiator. At the peak of his career, in 1971, British exhibitors voted Reed one of the most popular stars at the box office (5th).

 

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print in different sizes, signed and numbered by Bob Willoughby and is available to purchase here.


Dean Martin, Rat Pack Member

Dean Martin

Dean Martin

Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti; June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an American singer, film actor, television star and comedian.

One of the most popular and enduring American entertainers of the mid-20th Century, Martin was nicknamed the “King of Cool”  due to his seemingly effortless charisma and self-assuredness. A member of the “Rat Pack,” Martin was a major star in four areas of show business: concert stage/night clubs, recordings, motion pictures, and television.

Martin’s relaxed, warbling crooning voice earned him dozens of hit singles including his signature songs “Memories Are Made of This”, “That’s Amore”, “Everybody Loves Somebody”, “You’re Nobody till Somebody Loves You”, “Sway”, “Volare” and “Ain’t That a Kick in the Head?”.

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.

 

Source: Wikipedia

 


Audrey Hepburn, One Of The Most Famous Actresses Of All Time.

Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn

Actress, philanthropist. Born on May 4, 1929, in Brussels, Belgium. A talented performer, Audrey Hepburn was known for her beauty, elegance, and grace. Often imitated, she remains one of Hollywood’s greatest style icons. A native of Brussels, Hepburn spent part of her youth in England at a boarding school there. During much of World War II, she studied at the Arnhem Conservatory in The Netherlands. After the Nazis invaded the country, Hepburn and her mother struggled to survive. She reportedly helped the resistance movement by delivering messages, according to an article in The New York Times.

After the war, Hepburn continued to pursue an interest in dance. She studied ballet in Amsterdam and later in London. In 1948, Hepburn made her stage debut as a chorus girl in the musical High Button Shoes in London. More small parts on the British stage followed. She was a chorus girl in Sauce Tartare (1949), but was moved to a featured player in Sauce Piquante (1950). That same year, Hepburn made her feature film debut in 1951′s One Wild Oat in an uncredited role. She went on to parts in such films asYoung Wives’ Tales (1951) and The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) starring Alec Guiness. Her next project on the New York stage introduced her to American audiences.

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Bob Willoughby and is available to purchase here.

 


Groucho Marx

Groucho Marx

Groucho Marx

 

Julius Henry “Groucho” Marx (October 2, 1890  – August 19, 1977) was an American comedian and film and television star. He is known as a master of quick wit and widely considered one of the best comedians of the modern era.  His rapid-fire, often impromptu delivery of innuendo-laden patter earned him many admirers and imitators. He made 13 feature films with his siblings the Marx Brothers, of whom he was the third-born. He also had a successful solo career, most notably as the host of the radio and television game show You Bet Your Life. His distinctive appearance, carried over from his days in vaudeville, included quirks such as an exaggerated stooped posture, glasses, cigar, and a thick greasepaint mustache and eyebrows. These exaggerated features resulted in the creation of one of the world’s most ubiquitous and recognizable novelty disguises, known as “Groucho glasses”, a one-piece mask consisting of horn-rimmed glasses, large plastic nose, bushy eyebrows and mustache.

**Picture shown is available in limited edition print of only 50 in different sizes, signed and numbered by Terry O’ Neill and is available to purchase here.

Source: Wikipedia